A public service announcement to all the good people of Boston

You know those labels that are sewn onto the sleeves of coats, using a few loose stitches? Like, on suit jackets and overcoats? The ones that say the brand name or "100% wool" or something along these lines? These are not meant to be left on the garment once you purchase it.

Now, I know that the idea of stitches being temporary might be an overwhelming concept for you McExecutives who would never in a million years attempt to make or mend something, and who view everything as disposable rather than modifiable. But I promise you, loose stitching has been used in this manner for years and continues to be used on a lot of traditional garments. You don't go around wearing the size tags that are affixed by little plastic leashes, do you?

Another concern I have is why every single one of you tag-wearers got off at State Street, but this issue is much less pressing, given that it doesn't severely embarrass you, unlike riding around on the subway looking like you shoplifted your coat. I suppose though that if this trend continues, at least I will know in which neighborhood to start posting flyers and/or instruction manuals.


11 comments:

Jodie said...

Hmm... I've been known to forget to take off the Old Navy sticky tag that says the size on my clothing. There was a time when I wasn't embarassed by the size, but it's never been intentional. Sometimes they just make the things so hard to find once you're wearing the clothing...

But yeah, I know what you mean. Those things snip right off.

eeka said...

Yeah, I've found myself with XL XL XL XL XL XL stuck on my t-shirt more than once.

But dude, I'm talking about a suit or overcoat, which one would presumably have tried on in a full-length mirror, had someone check for fit, likely had altered, and so forth. I don't think these overlooked.

linda said...

What particularly irks me is when people leave the basting stiches in the bottom of pleats. I can guarantee you that at least 80% of young financial district account execs have left the stich in the back pleat of their burberrys.

Anonymous said...

does it bother you when teenagers leave the tag on the hats, too? i know it is cool to make fun of people who work for a living, but not cool to joke about young drug dealers

eeka said...

1) Anonymous comments that make assumptions about how "liberals" or whatever think are irritating. Get some balls already.

2) I absolutely make fun of urban teens who leave the tags on their hats.

3) I also don't assume that they deal drugs based on their hat choices, and I also know that most of the kids with the goofy hats don't deal drugs, since I actually interact with urban teens on a regular basis.

eeka said...

YES. I was thinking about mentioning the basting stitches, but wondered if it was too obscure. Dude, I wear jeans and a hoodie most days, and I know the dos and don'ts of formal clothing!

EEK said...

I am amused when people take tags off the back of pants but leave the four white threads that were holding the tag on. This is especially amusing on dark pants because then the white thread is especially noticable.

ECS said...

maybe they want to make sure we all know that it contains Genuine Cashmere (although you'd think they'd take off the ones that only say 10% cashmere)... that was one of my favorite things to laugh silently to myself about. That and when the kick pleat on a coat was still stapled down at the bottom. Didn't they wonder why it seemed awfully hard to walk?

Anonymous said...

Please post about those flimsy leather tags that women leave on their Coach bags. They were never meant to stay on there post-purchase, but there they remain, like cheap tacky bag jewelry.

jason said...

Ah, but what's the point of buying designer clothing unless you can very clearly advertise your purchase? (This may be why I have no interest or knowledge of designer clothing.)

Anonymous said...

I see those same tags on "cashmere" scarves that are sold on the street in NYC.

I once bought a very cute skirt, and neglected to take the basting out of the bottom pleats. What an idjut.

-Katy