They don't need science or competence -- they're the government

Dr. James Holsinger co-founded a church in Kentucky that specializes in "conversion" therapy for gays and lesbians. He also authored an extensive paper attempting to make a medical argument that homosexuality is unnatural and unhealthy.

Which is all fine, except that he's been nominated as the U.S. Surgeon General. Because, you know, the surgeon general doesn't need to have any knowledge of standard medical views or anything. Go here to urge your senator and representative to oppose the nomination. This is especially important for people in Massachusetts, because Ted Kennedy is on the committee that will hold the hearings on the nomination. Yes, we have every reason to believe that Ted Kennedy will oppose such ridiculousness, but it can help him to make his case if he can report that 90% of his constituents asked him to oppose the nomination. Wouldn't that be fabulous? So go click now.



4 comments:

Jodie said...

How does he still have a medical license?

eeka said...

Well, on NPR he claimed that he was summarizing the literature when he wrote those papers and that they aren't his own views in working with people. Still, I'd think it would be unethical to summarize inaccurate literature without explicitly presenting it as such.

I imagine that most of these people still have licenses and jobs because the people sitting on review boards and such generally aren't lawyers. A lot of them operate under the mistaken idea that people can go against policies or ethical guidelines as long as they couch it in a religious belief. In other words, these people are afraid to take any action that might get them accused of disrespecting someone's religious beliefs. But there is absolutely no law that states that people can violate other laws or policies based on religious beliefs. People only have the right to receive reasonable accomodations, like trading work schedules with someone else when your religion has a holiday. They don't have the right to neglect ethical standards or essential job functions.

It's about as ridiculous as me becoming a Scientologist and saying that I insist on keeping my job, but that mental health services go against my beliefs, so I'm going to refuse to provide any and I still want to be paid. It would be my right to be a Scientologist, but not to express beliefs at work that go against what I'm supposed to be doing at work.

Jodie said...

As a Scientologist, instead of having people sit on the couch, you could jump up and down on it.

Wait, that might give you ideas...

eeka said...

Jumpin up and down and shoutin KILL! KILL!