Do you want to know just how much I hate freakin' sitekey crap on bank websites?

(click for larger)




And yes, I know I'm going to get some drive-by anonymous commenter telling me that posting this means that people can hack into my account. No, it really doesn't, because they don't know my username and password in the first place. The sitekey crap is to protect stupid people who would otherwise enter their username and password into phishing sites; it doesn't get you into my account. Also, if you did get into my line of credit, all you'd really be able to do is transfer money back and forth between my line of credit and my checking accounts, which I'm sure is extremely satisfying to big bad criminals.


2 comments:

Jan said...

You are right, of course. On the other hand, now that you've written this, there are some weird people out there who would love to do as you suggest and they are smart enough to find a way to transfer your money back and forth. You go out to spend the money you think you have in your checking account and couple of days later you receive in the mail 5 nsfs from the bank (because you wrote 5 checks). Let's see, the going rate is $20 or more per nsf, so 5 x $20 is somewhere around $100? $100 that you no longer have because of the bank charges . . .
Or did I completely misunderstand?

eeka said...

Yeah, I think you're missing a few pieces of it. They'd need my username and password to get into the account; the sitekey crap is just so I don't go enter my information into some phishing site. The sitekey crap won't get them in without my username and password. Even if they did get into my line of credit account, they couldn't access my checking accounts, because the account numbers are asterisked out. I don't think it even lists what banks I have checking accounts with.